OMICRON BA.5 SUBVARIANT OF CORONAVIRUS

07/20/22

 

The Omicron variant, first identified in South Africa, is the predominant strain of COVID-19 in the United States. Viruses constantly change through mutation and these mutations result in a new variants of the virus. New variants will continue to emerge, and most recently, we are seeing the emergence of the BA.5 Omicron subvariant. Here are some things to keep in mind:

  • Omicron and its variants, including BA.5, spread more easily than other variants. The BA.5 variant is very contagious and is contributing to increases in hospitalizations and ICU admissions.
  • The BA.5 variant does not currently appear to cause more severe cases of COVID-19. There is no current evidence that it leads to a higher death rate.
  • Symptoms resemble cold symptoms (sore throat, runny nose and fatigue); loss of taste or smell is less common.
  • Being up to date on recommended vaccines is effective at preventing severe illness, hospitalizations, and death with the new variants. Individuals who have been immunized or have been infected before and/or immunized will likely have less severe symptoms if they get reinfected.
  • Variant emergences further emphasize the importance of vaccinations and boosters. Vaccinations can help stop new variants from developing
  • To minimize the risk of infection, wear a mask and continue to practice social distance, particularly in crowded indoor environments.

We will provide new information about Omicron BA.5 subvariant as it becomes available. For additional details, please see the latest CDC update.

As the Omicron variants spread, EHE Health clinics have what you need—COVID-19 tests, vaccines, and boosters—to be safe. Members can receive COVID-19 testing regardless of their last appointment date.

EHE Health locations adhere to the highest safety standards. Our tested and vaccine-boosted staff are here to help you stay protected against COVID-19 now and healthier for years to come.

Convenient appointments are available now. Call 888.672.8172 to schedule.

    MONKEYPOX UPDATE

    2022 U.S. Monkeypox Outbreak

    08/08/22

     

    On August 4th, 2022 monkeypox was declared a public health emergency. EHE is focused on helping our members, their families, and the community stay informed and as safe as possible with the monkeypox outbreak. Monkeypox is a contagious disease caused by the monkeypox virus.  Anyone can acquire monkeypox.

    Monkeypox spreads by direct contact with an infected person. Touching the infectious rash, scabs, or body fluids, during intimate physical contact (such as kissing, cuddling, or sex), touching objects, fabrics (such as clothing or linens) that previously touched the rash or body fluids of someone with monkeypox, and respiratory secretions during prolonged, face-to-face contact all increases the chance of developing Monkeypox. A person is contagious until all sores have healed, and a new layer of skin has formed, which can take two to four weeks.

    The most common symptoms are a rash or sores that can look like pimples or blisters and swollen lymph glands; the rash can appear anywhere on the body including the mouth, genitals, and anus. Flu-like symptoms, such as fever, chills, headache, and tiredness can occur (before or at the same time as the rash).

    If you have symptoms, immediately isolate at home, avoid contact with others, and talk to your health care provider. To reduce the chance of getting and spreading monkeypox, avoid direct, close contact with someone suspected of having or diagnosed with monkeypox. Wash your hands often with soap and water or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer and wear a mask if closer than six feet.

    Currently there is no treatment approved specifically for monkeypox virus infections. However, most people get better on their own without treatment. Data suggests the smallpox vaccine is at least 85% effective in preventing monkeypox. Antivirals developed for use in patients with smallpox may prove beneficial. 

    As vaccines supply is presently limited, vaccination is recommended in high-risk groups for prevention after exposure to someone infected with monkeypox. The CDC recommends the vaccine be given within four days after the exposure in order to prevent onset of the disease. Check your state’s Department of Health website for more information on vaccine availability. If you are showing symptoms, we can connect you to your healthcare provider or refer you to a primary care physician. Contact our Health Navigation Center at 844.258.1820

      EHE Health's safe at work

      EHE Health has announced the launch of its Safe-at-Work Management System, designed to help employers keep their essential workforce on the job and plan for the process of re-starting their non-essential worksites in the future. Read more here. 

      We remain focused on helping our members, their families, and the community stay as safe as possible during the COVID-19 outbreak. Our offices and clinics remain closed in accordance with public health guidance. We will reschedule patients—this includes appointments at our clinics and at network provider locations—when it’s safe to do so. In the interim, we will be providing updates and digital resources here to help you stay healthy during this challenging period.

      Are you an EHE Health client partner? Download our COVID-19 toolkit here. 

      Keeping Our Clinics Safe for You

      EHE Health puts safety first, always. 

      We continue to evaluate and refine our safety protocols to reflect the latest data, ensuring that they meet the highest and most up-to-date standards. 

      For more on how EHE Health creates a safe clinical environment for you,  please click here. 

      TIPS FOR A
      SAFER WORKDAY

      Once you’ve been cleared to return to
      your workplace through the Safe at Work™  program, it’s important to maintain
      good health by continuing COVID-19 preventive measures.

      Here are some tips:

      Commute

      If you use public transit, maintain as much distance as possible from other passengers.
      Wear a face covering. Use hand sanitizer after touching any surfaces or doors.

      Food

      If possible, pack your lunch at home and eat at your desk rather than in a shared space.

      Exercise

      While gyms near your workplace may be reopening, it’s safer to continue  working out at  home.  

      Office

      Do not shake hands. Hold virtual meetings when possible and limit in-person meetings
      to small, physically distanced groups. 

      4 TIPS FOR PARENTS COPING WITH COVID-19

      As the COVID-19 situation continues to disrupt typical family life, parents may be facing a different set of challenges.

      Whether your children are young and frightened about what’s going on, teenagers coping with the loss of what’s typically the season for prom and graduation, or even young adults out on their own but struggling with the practical realities of lockdown—parent-child bonds are central to moving through this period.
      Try these ways of helping your kids thrive despite COVID-19.

      why exercise is so important right now

      Exercise is always good for your health, but it’s especially important while many of us remain cooped up at home. 

      If you haven’t put exercise into your daily routine, now’s the time! No matter how you get moving, whether it’s an online class or push-ups in the middle of the day, the important thing is to get moving.

      Rise & Thrive with EHE Health

      Ep. 27: Sports Nutrition For You

      Good sports nutrition is incredibly important as we pursue our goals, but it can also be an intimidating topic. What should you know? Athlete’s Pursuit podcast co-hosts Joe Rodonis, a performance coach, and Ryan Turner, a registered dietitian and founder of Food Is Fuel NYC, will join EHE’s Health Mentor Katie Casey to discuss sports nutrition and how to use it in your life.

      Have questions
      about Covid-19?
      let us answer them.

       

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      Need more
      immediate help?

      If you have any questions, please call our COVID-19 hotline at 844.258.1820, open Monday–Friday 8AM–5PM EDT. The hotline is operated by EHE Health doctors and nurses trained in COVID-19 guidelines per CDC.

      After hours, please email COVID-19@ehe.health.